Alpina BC 1600 Boot

Real reviews by real skiers. What a concept! Add your own today. Reviews only please, questions can be posted as replies but new threads looking for opinions should be posted to the main Telemark Talk Forum.
User avatar
MicahE
XCD Enthusiast
XCD Enthusiast
Posts: 37
Joined: Thu Dec 05, 2019 2:43 pm

Re: Alpina BC 1600 Boot

Post by MicahE » Fri Feb 14, 2020 5:44 pm

GuillaumeM wrote:
Thu Feb 13, 2020 11:32 am
I am looking at this shoes also for my girlfriend. Can you give some impressions about the sole? Does it feel stiffer than the Alaska as well? Can you squeeze the shoe/sole with your hands only or do you need to put the shoe on the ground and use your body weight? A stiff sole with torsional rigidity is more important than ankle support (even if ankle support is nice as well).
I'm not in a good position to compare the soles of the 1600 with the Alaskas. The nearest pair of Alaskas are 3.5 hours away from me and it has been close to a month since I tried them on.

The sole of my 1600s feel very stiff to me, granted they have only been skied in once (though I'm heading out with them this weekend). If by "squeeze the shoe/sole" with my hands you mean to flex them at the ball of the foot, I can only barely make any flex with my hands (and I'm fairly strong). I can get very slightly more flex when twisting it along the front back axis. Somewhere along the line I got the impression that all these BC soles are made by the same company and have about the same flex.

In terms of the responses lilcliffy got from the Alpina in 2015, I can't corroborate based on my very limited experience. Handling the Alaskas, I definitely recall me being surprised at how lightweight the ankle support felt. Whereas wearing the 1600s left me with an immediate impression of feeling a lot more solid. I was ready to love the Alaskas and assumed I would buy them based on all the positive reviews. I was going to be OK with the flexy ankle, figuring it'd be nice for K&G skiing, but I got too much of a pinch pain in the front of the ankle. The 1600s felt/feel like a solid hiking boot, that's the best way I can describe it. To me, in the store, the Alaskas felt like a solid hiking shoe with a more flexy portion from the ankle up.

I was skeptical of the fabric lace anchor at the ankle of the Alaskas, in terms of longevity. I was happy to see the 1600s have a locking type metal anchor there and well polished rounded anchors elswhere. I remember though that the snowboard boots that I've worn the past 15 seasons have fabric lace anchors and I haven't had a problem with those.

Really though, it comes down to personal fit and feeling. I think it's worth eating $20 in shipping to try on options to see what feels the best for your girlfriend. This is not a short term purchase unless she decides she doesn't like xc skiing anymore.

User avatar
GuillaumeM
XCD Enthusiast
XCD Enthusiast
Posts: 9
Joined: Sun Jan 12, 2020 11:04 am

Re: Alpina BC 1600 Boot

Post by GuillaumeM » Sat Feb 15, 2020 8:41 am

Thank you for your well explained answer. It seems like a very nice boot giving the price (I can get a pair for 140 euros). I was today in a shop and there is quite a difference between the different shoes in term of flex. So far the Crispi Stetind and the Alaska are the two most powerful boots I have found. All the old Alfa models are very soft. The Guard Advance is nice but has its very own foot style.

I cannot find any bc1600 in shops unfortunately, only online. Might take a chance and see ;)

User avatar
lilcliffy
XCD KNIGHT
XCD KNIGHT
Posts: 2408
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 2015 7:20 pm
Location: Stanley, New Brunswick, Canada
Ski style: Nordic backcountry touring
Favorite Skis: Asnes Ingstad BC; Asnes Gamme 54 BC; Asnes Storetind Carbon
Favorite boots: Alfa Guard Advance BC; Alpina Alaska BC; Scarpa T4
Occupation: Forestry Professional
Instructor at Maritime College of Forest Technology
Husband, father, farmer and logger

Re: Alpina BC 1600 Boot

Post by lilcliffy » Sun Feb 16, 2020 12:23 pm

GuillaumeM wrote:
Sat Feb 15, 2020 8:41 am
Thank you for your well explained answer. It seems like a very nice boot giving the price (I can get a pair for 140 euros). I was today in a shop and there is quite a difference between the different shoes in term of flex. So far the Crispi Stetind and the Alaska are the two most powerful boots I have found. All the old Alfa models are very soft. The Guard Advance is nice but has its very own foot style.

I cannot find any bc1600 in shops unfortunately, only online. Might take a chance and see ;)
The Guard Advance has a softer sole flex- compared to the Alaska BC. I would rate the Guard as being a bit stiffer than the Svartisen BC.
Is the sole flex of the Stetind similar to the Alaska BC?
Cross-country AND down-hill skiing in the backcountry.
Unashamed to be a "cross-country type" and love skiing down-hill.

User avatar
lilcliffy
XCD KNIGHT
XCD KNIGHT
Posts: 2408
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 2015 7:20 pm
Location: Stanley, New Brunswick, Canada
Ski style: Nordic backcountry touring
Favorite Skis: Asnes Ingstad BC; Asnes Gamme 54 BC; Asnes Storetind Carbon
Favorite boots: Alfa Guard Advance BC; Alpina Alaska BC; Scarpa T4
Occupation: Forestry Professional
Instructor at Maritime College of Forest Technology
Husband, father, farmer and logger

Re: Alpina BC 1600 Boot

Post by lilcliffy » Sun Feb 16, 2020 12:30 pm

MicahE wrote:
Fri Feb 14, 2020 5:44 pm
Somewhere along the line I got the impression that all these BC soles are made by the same company and have about the same flex.
The NNNBC outsoles are all identical and made by Rottefella.

The stiffness and stability of the boot sole is a result of the materials and design of the midsole. There is a wide range in sole flex between currently available NNNBC boots.

Alpina may well have increased the stiffness of the midsole on the current BC1600.
It certainly sounds like it has a stiffer sole flex than both the Crispi Svartisen BC and the slightly stiffer Alfa Guard Advance.

Very cool. Please keep letting us know how you make out with this boot!
Cross-country AND down-hill skiing in the backcountry.
Unashamed to be a "cross-country type" and love skiing down-hill.

Post Reply