East Coast S Bound advice

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lilcliffy
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Re: East Coast S Bound advice

Post by lilcliffy » Mon Nov 23, 2015 12:23 pm

I'll be interested in your thorough comparison of the S-78 versus the S-88...perhaps you'll include that in your review? :ugeek:

My limited experience with the S-78/S-88 is that the camber is similar- the flex of the S-78 is stiffer. My limited experience was that the S-78 performed better on denser snow- the S-88 performed better on soft, fresh snow (similar to the Eon/XCD GT).

BUT- with both of these skis in your quiver, you'll be able to give us a much better test than I can!

And I agree with you- the S-112 is wide enough that I need a relatively rigid, burly boot to hold it on edge (at least on dense/hard snow, and very steep terrain).

That being said- the S-98 is still quite a ski. I can drive and telemark my Epochs with the Rossi BCX6- BUT only in soft, fresh snow. IME, the S-98 is easier to turn than the Epoch/10 th Mtn. This may allow you to push the soft boot boundaries with the S-98- further than I can with the Epoch. But this may also may be simply a matter of personal skill!

Regardless- having the narrower S-78/S-88 will allow you to restrict your use of the S-98 to the ideal conditions for your boot/binding.

You've got my favourite mtn binding- the 3-pin-cable! So versatile! Xcountry performance, plus downhill power.

I unfortunately have decided to maintain both 3-pin-cable and NNN-BC setups. I unfortunately have been happier with the performance of the NNN-BC versions of most light leather /composite Nordic boots- the BCX6 included.

Will be VERY interested in your experiences with the S-98 and the Rossi BCX675-3-pin-cable setup.
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Woodserson
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Re: East Coast S Bound advice

Post by Woodserson » Mon Nov 23, 2015 6:50 pm

lilcliffy wrote: Regardless- having the narrower S-78/S-88 will allow you to restrict your use of the S-98 to the ideal conditions for your boot/binding.
BOOM right here, is my logic. I'm flexing the 78 and 88 in my living room and they seem too similar to really work out any appreciable difference. It's really me spoiling me, here with these two skis.

The 98 is going to be my downhill good conditions ski.

I hear it with the NNN-BC set ups, my long distance skis are all set up with Magnums and I really really love them for that kind of touring. I did have NNN-BC on my 78's originally, and once I swapped to the 3 pin, I never looked back for that kind of ski. For me, personally, it was a huge uptick in performance for the downhill stuff. I think I have a good set-up here, my master quiver is coming together really nicely! I can't wait for some snow!

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lilcliffy
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Favorite Skis: Asnes Ingstad BC; Asnes Gamme 54 BC; Asnes Falketind 62;Asnes Storetind Carbon
Favorite boots: Alfa Guard Advance BC; Alpina Alaska BC; Scarpa T4
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Re: East Coast S Bound advice

Post by lilcliffy » Tue Nov 24, 2015 5:46 am

You'll be using your skins less with the S-98 as well- (compared to the S-78) that extra width underfoot, coupled with less camber makes a huge difference when climbing.

You sound like you get out and about more than I do these days- skiing on a wider range of snow and terrain conditions than I. It will be interesting to hear how much you end up using each of the S-Bounds.

I'll also be interested in how much you use the cable with the S-98.

Your comment regarding the downhill stability and power of 3-pin versus NNN-BC- do you mean the basic 3-pin binding or are you referring to the 3-pin-cable?

Personally- I do not find I get more downhill power and stability out of the standard 3-pin versus NNN-BC. When it comes to 3-pin versus NNN-BC, I find that it is more about the power and stability in the boot, rather than the binding.

The 3-pin-cable is another story though- whole higher level of downhill power and stability. More torsional power- and more binding resistance. That extra binding resistance is too restricting for K&G- but man can you transfer power to the ski edge with it.

The power of the cable (and perhaps in the future even more powerful bindings) are the reason that I will keep my 75mm, 3-pin setups going, at least for the time being. There are slopes, terrain and cover conditions that I have skied on in the past, that I still can't reasonably imagine skiing on NNN-BC. But again- this may be due to limitations in my skill, rather than limitations of the binding-boot.

No matter how far your skills can push the limits of a boot-binding- ther must be limit to the power and stability of a boot-binding system. Especially for mere mortals like myself!
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lowangle al
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Re: East Coast S Bound advice

Post by lowangle al » Thu Nov 26, 2015 3:47 am

Here is what I think Wooderson, it sounds like you want to bushwack, ski treeless summits and auto roads among other hilly places. You need a ski on the fatter end, probably the 112, at 78 underfoot it would carve easy enough with a leather boot and three pins like T man said. I don't know about your boot, but if it won't controll a 78mm waisted ski you need to upgrade.

I would also go short no matter what ski you get. I would go 10 cm shorter than a ski that you would buy if you want to go fast. Those auto roads and summit tours are pretty far from the car and I'd be more concerned about not getting hurt than saving a couple minutes.

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Re: East Coast S Bound advice

Post by Teleman » Fri Nov 27, 2015 8:23 am

Agree with LowAA.....Short for the 112 because it's so wide...You will get float in the deep but for the 78's keep them on the longer side of comfortable for you as they will cruise better....When it comes to leathers boots....We try to have Norwegian welted boots....Whatever we can get at a ski swap or anywhere really....Lace up...buckle...doesn't matter...TM

MikeK

Re: East Coast S Bound advice

Post by MikeK » Mon Nov 30, 2015 2:03 pm

Oh there's surely a difference between a lace and a buckle.

We should start a 40 page thread discussing it...

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connyro
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Re: East Coast S Bound advice

Post by connyro » Mon Nov 30, 2015 2:32 pm

MikeK wrote:Oh there's surely a difference between a lace and a buckle.
There's NO difference if your dress code dictates strictly leather boots, regardless of how much plastic is inserted into the cuffs and uppers. :)
MikeK wrote:We should start a 40 page thread discussing it...
I've got a pair of Merrell 2-buckle leathers and they are the most aggressively forward-leaning and uncomfortable boot I own. They are terrible for touring. Not anything like my Asolo Snowfield 2's which are soft, non-buckle lace-up leathers. Those are some nice, light, comfortable boots.

MikeK

Re: East Coast S Bound advice

Post by MikeK » Mon Nov 30, 2015 2:38 pm

My dress code dictates whatever my feet will tolerate. I have a pair of Asolo Snowpines (leather over plastic) which give me the worst blisters imaginable.

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connyro
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Re: East Coast S Bound advice

Post by connyro » Mon Nov 30, 2015 2:52 pm

MikeK wrote:My dress code dictates whatever my feet will tolerate. I have a pair of Asolo Snowpines (leather over plastic) which give me the worst blisters imaginable.
My dress code dictates whatever seems right for the conditions. I can't wait to start sporting the bright-red Alpina Alaskas! (are those really as garish as they look online?)

I think those Snowpines are slightly lower cut than the Snowfield 2's...I think the hardest thing about leathers is getting a good fit without paying for it with blisters from "breaking them in"!

MikeK

Re: East Coast S Bound advice

Post by MikeK » Mon Nov 30, 2015 2:58 pm

Garish? Nah.

Image

They are very, very orange though. If you wear them during hunting season I doubt anyone would shoot your foot.

I think the plastic cuff inside the boot is what bothers me. I asked a boot fitter if he could heat it and shape it, but he didn't seem so confident. The leather itself is nice and loose and soft.

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